I wanted to share a few thoughts for some little things you can do in your marketing efforts to go the extra mile and stand out from competitors.

When you’re at a conference, don’t just sit on your phone checking your email. Really detach from your day-to-day work and immerse yourself in the conference experience.

Take a look at a Q&A with me and my 2019 LMA Northeast Regional Conference co-chair Bob Robertson by Jacob Eidinger about our plans for #LMANE19. what we are each most excited about with regard to the conference and why you should join us in the Big Apple on November 14/15!

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Kindness is something I have been writing about a lot lately, and we can do so much to give back to others who really need help in a time of need or crisis. For example: 

Maybe they need a hand with childcare, a shoulder to cry on or extra help at work. 

Also, people get

Sometimes we need a reminder of the basics needed to be successful at work especially after being away on vacation or slacking off a bit during the summer.

The fall is a great time to refocus ourselves and find new meaning in our work, and to be a more engaged employee and colleague. Remember you

It’s important to remember that you should be kind to everyone, because every industry is incredibly tight knit.

Also, everyone is a potential referral source, or someone who could potentially hire you or recommend you for a job. You never know who knows who, and just like everyone checks you out online, people also ask

I came across a great article with helpful tips on networking best practices that I wanted to share. The main points from it are:

1. Never ask for what you want. Ask how you can help.

2. Focus on goals—but not your goals.

3. When someone tells you what they do, immediately follow up by

Women can be pretty ruthless to each other in the workplace. Backstabbing, rumor spreading, malicious talking, gossiping, purposely excluding someone from an event or meeting, taking credit for someone’s work or helping to push someone out of a job.

I bet many of you have experienced behavior such as the ones mentioned above at the hands of another woman.

I call this the dark side of working with women.

Those close to me know that I have wanted to write an article on how to recognize a mean girl at work and develop strategies to effectively manage her and succeed in spite of her undermining behavior for a long time. (As an aside, I’ve also dealt with a few “mean guys” too, but that’s for a different article.)

Today, I am lucky enough to work in an environment free of mean girls (thank goodness!), that I don’t come into contact with them from time to time, or carry with me the memory of some terrible experiences of working with some very toxic females. Learning how to navigate them is an important skill to have throughout your career.

Before I delve deeper into this topic, I want to make it very clear that are plenty of amazing, supportive women in the workforce, and I’ve been very lucky to work with a number of them. They aren’t threatened by other women, and instead they go above and beyond to help others succeed. They are true role models. This article isn’t about them. I could have written an entire series of articles about the supportive women who have mentored me throughout my career. This article is about those women in the workplace who do not have your best interests at heart, and how to protect yourself against them. It’s important to remember that while you cannot can’t change someone else, you can change your own behavior, and this article will teach you how to do just that. 
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I recently achieved two major professional successes by putting myself out there and asking for them. I know it sounds a bit, well, basic, but I felt really good about going out on a limb and seizing the right moment to make a big ask in each of these situations.

So often, we are afraid